Review of the 2018 Canadian Electrical Code for adoption in BC

Consultation feedback summary report

Between February 26 and July 31, 2018, Technical Safety BC consulted with a range of experts and stakeholders to determine the impact and appropriateness of adopting the 2018 CEC in British Columbia. This was completed through one-to-one consultation meetings with key stakeholders, an advisory panel and an online public consultation. This report summarizes the feedback received from stakeholders during the consultation period.

Consultation with key stakeholder groups

A total of 25 stakeholder groups met with Technical Safety BC between February 26 and July 13, 2018.to participate in one-to-one meetings regarding the impact of the 2018 CEC changes. These stakeholder groups represented the construction and maintenance sectors, electrical contractors, electrical inspectors, engineers and designers, manufacturers and distributors, labour unions, first responders, utilities and education/training providers. Stakeholders were identified based on interest and impact to their membership.

Table 1. Stakeholder group support for adoption of the 2018 Canadian Electrical Code (CEC) in BC

Level of support

Count

Percentage

Supportive

22

88%

Neutral

3

12%

Opposed

0

0%

Total

25

100%

Overall, stakeholders had no major concerns with the adoption of the 2018 CEC and believed that it improved safety and that there was a net positive cost savings in this edition of the code. It was noted that the process for code adoption is not always clear to industry and that delays in code adoption have an impact on training, job forecasting, and other areas of business.

Advisory panel of industry experts

An advisory panel composed of 11 industry experts met between April 19 and July 14, 2018 to provide Technical Safety BC with insight on the impact of the 2018 changes on industry and to provide recommendations on adoption of the 2018 CEC in BC.

Table 2. Industry advisory panel support for adoption of the 2018 Canadian Electrical Code (CEC) in BC

Level of support

Count

Percentage

Supportive

11

100%

Neutral

0

0%

Opposed

0

0%

Total

11

100%

Overall, the group supported adoption of the 2018 CEC in BC, although it identified a number of sections in the 2018 CEC that would have an impact to industry as a result of increased costs, changes in current practice, etc (e.g., identified conductors at switches, changes to Section 10 on bonding and grounding methods).

Public consultation

Technical Safety BC launched an online public consultation from June 1 to July 31, 2018. A total of 202 respondents completed the survey. This is a significant increase from the 38 individuals that participated in the 2015 CEC online public consultation.

Table 3. Representation of industry groups among public consultation respondents

Groups

Count

Percentage 

Field Safety Representatives

41

20%

Red Seal Electricians

58

29%

Licensed contractors

41

20%

Other trades

11

5%

Property owner/managers

16

8%

Developer/architects

4

2%

Educator/training providers

10

5%

Manufacturer/distributors

3

1%

Other regulatory agencies

5

2%

Government

14

7%

Homeowners/members of the general public

39

19%

Other

13

6%

Table 4. Public consultation respondent support for adoption of the 2018 Canadian Electrical Code (CEC) in BC

Level of support

Count

Percentage1

Supportive

122

60%

Neutral

26

13%

Opposed

18

9%

Unsure

34

17%

Total

202

100%

Overall, respondents supported adoption of the 2018 CEC into BC as the changes were seen to improve safety, provide greater clarity and ease of use, and support up to date training. Of those who did not support adoption, it was felt that adoption of the 2018 CEC would increase costs but not improve safety and that there were still areas of the code that required additional clarity.

Amendment requests

Only one complete proposal for amendment was received during the consultation period. This proposal recommended the not adopting Section 66-456 subrule (7) and (8) from the 2018 edition of the CEC. These requirements were added to the 2015 edition of the CEC, thereby disallowing the use of t-taps in temporary electrical installations, a method used widely within the film industry in BC.

Table 5. Level of support for an amendment to Section 66-464 (7)(8) of the 2018 CEC

Level of support

Key stakeholder groups

Industry Expert advisory panel members

Public consultation respondents

Supportive

100%2

100%

42%

Neutral   0% 26%

Opposed

0%

0%

7%

Unsure

0%

0%

25%

 

1. Total is greater than 100% as respondents were allowed to select multiple categories.

2. Key stakeholder groups were only asked whether they had concerns with the amendment, not their level of agreement.

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