Scheduled Maintenance for Online Services

Online Services will be unavailable due to scheduled maintenance from June 21 at 6 pm until June 24 at 8 am.  

Scheduled Maintenance for Online Services

Online Services will be unavailable due to scheduled maintenance from June 21 at 6 pm until June 24 at 8 am.  

Injuries

Annual State of Safety 2023

Injuries

The number of injuries reported to us in a given year provides an important indicator of the impacts of the hazards inherent in regulated equipment. Together with industry, our goal is to minimize incidents and injuries by identifying, understanding, and reducing risk across the safety system.

Technical Safety BC receives its injury reports and descriptions from operators or first responders at the time of, or immediately following, the incident. Injuries reports are based on evidence available during investigation and any long-term effects of an injury are not reflected in the statistics.

Eleven* injuries were ranked as “major” in 2023. One* fatal injury was also reported. Of these injuries, four of them were related to carbon monoxide incidents, a risk ranked within our top five safety risks for 2023.

Other major injuries were a result of incidents involving gas explosions on two separate occasions; sudden escalator stoppage; zipline collision; and a recovery boiler explosion.

*These numbers do not include injuries in the railways technology.

Two occupants in a residential home were exposed to high levels of carbon monoxide (CO) and sent to the hospital as one occupant lost consciousness. It was found that the manifold gas pressure on their 54 year-old furnace was set at higher than the maximum allowable pressure specified by the manufacturer. Incomplete combustion produced high levels of CO. Interior building layout, blower fan operation, and openings in the return air ducting caused back-drafting and recirculation of the furnace’s flue gasses containing CO to spread throughout the home. Installation of a carbon monoxide detector and maintaining equipment may have prevented this incident. Read more.

In Sparwood, BC, an individual was found unresponsive inside of a house under construction. Investigators found a portable gasoline-fueled electric generator which was being used to supply power for a space heater and construction activities. The portable generator provided 120/240-volt electricity and was powered by a single cylinder gasoline fueled four stroke engine. The generator had an approval mark and met Environment Canada’s emission standards. However, it was not intended for use in enclosed spaces indoors and was labeled with a carbon monoxide warning. This tragedy may have been avoided with a better understanding of how to safely use a generator and knowing the signs of carbon monoxide poisoning. There are no current requirements for carbon monoxide safety shutoff systems for portable electric generators in BC. Read more.

At a busy transit station, a downward-traveling escalator carrying riders experienced a mechanical failure that rendered all of the safety and braking systems ineffective. Following the failure, the weight of onboarding passengers caused the escalator to overspeed several times, including after the emergency stop button was pressed. Riders were unable to disembark safely as they fell and piled up at the bottom of the escalator. Despite being compliant in design, installation, and operation, a mechanical failure and inadequate notification to passengers led to a multiple injuries. The equipment did not have a way of warning passengers of the hazardous condition immediately after the mechanical failure. A barricade was put into place as soon as possible but not before several passengers were able to board the escalator resulting in the final runaway incident. Passengers are reminded not to use stopped escalators as the step heights at the top and bottom may not meet requirements or unseen hazardous conditions may exist. Read more.

 

Injury Categories

FatalAn injury causing death.
InsignificantAn incident that resulted with insignificant and/or insignificant equipment damage
MajorAn injury where residual effects are likely to significantly affect long-term quality of life.
ModerateAn injury where residual effects are unlikely to significantly affect long-term quality of life. E.g., temporary loss of consciousness, fractures, concussions.
MinorAn injury where there are typically no residual effects and recovery is expected. E.g., bruises, cuts, minor disorientation (confusion).
InsignificantAn injury where there are typically no residual effects and full recovery is expected. E.g., temporary pain and discomfort.

Injury Data for 2023

 

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