Who needs an electrical permit?

  • Owners of industrial, commercial, residential, and institutional facilities operating or maintaining regulated electrical equipment and systems.
  • Some examples of facilities that likely require an operating permit are schools, hospitals, senior centres, hotels, office towers, warehouses, shopping malls, stadiums, ice rinks, bowling alleys, labs, pharma companies, pulp and paper mills, recycling plants.
  • Owners and operators of electrical equipment or systems that require ongoing maintenance, are operated within hazardous locations (Zone 0, 1, 2, 20, 21, 22), are part of a fire alarm system, or operate for an emergency service.
  • Owners and operators of electrical equipment or systems located in a facility where the rated service capacity of electrical equipment (main service switch or transformer for example) is over 250 kVA, or where electrical supply in a facility is greater than 250 kVA, or where the electrical supply to non-utility, privately owned equipment is greater than 750 volts (except for high voltage neon signs).
  • Owners of regulated electrical equipment or their representatives are responsible for obtaining and renewing operating permits. A representative can be the lessee of the building, or a person or company who is authorized by the owner to act on their behalf (such as the agent of a property management company).
  • Owner of electrical equipment or a licensed electrical contractor acting on their behalf can apply for temporary entertainment operating permits.

Who issues the permit?

Technical Safety BC issues the permit, unless you are located in one of the following areas, where you should check with the municipality or district.

  • Burnaby
  • Maple Ridge
  • North Vancouver
  • Surrey
  • Victoria
  • Vancouver
  • West Vancouver

Learn more about jurisdiction.

Getting a permit from Technical Safety BC

  1. Apply and pay for a permit through your account or using this online form. If you use the form, you will have to submit payment separately through mail, or by calling us. When applying, the form will ask you to identify a Field Safety Representative (FSR). Please be sure to have this information ready.
  2. Once your application is approved, Technical Safety BC will issue a permit number.

Need help? Contact us.
 

How much does a permit cost?

The fee for a permit depends on the type of operations. See the full fee schedule. Technical Safety BC is a not-for-profit organization. Fees associated with permits allow us to work with industry to reduce safety risks through assessment, education and outreach, enforcement and research.