Multi-year Incident Case Studies

When an elevator is called to a floor, the car’s platform is required to stop within a certain distance of the floor when the doors are fully open. Older elevators constructed to codes earlier than the 2000 edition are required to level to within two inches of the landing, but newer elevators must level to half an inch. Due to a number of component failures or design limitations, elevators may level outside of this accepted clearance posing a tripping and falling hazard for people getting on or off the elevator. This case study provides a detailed analysis of elevator leveling incidents reported to Technical Safety BC from 2007 to 2015, and their causes.
An ammonia release incident is an unexpected and uncontrolled release of refrigerant from a system. Depending on exposure, health hazards can range from temporary mild discomfort to irreversible, serious damage to exposed tissues. This case study provides a detailed analysis of ammonia release incidents reported to Technical Safety BC from 2007 to 2017, and their causes.
While aerial ropeways such as gondolas, chair lifts, rope tows and T-bars are typically very safe, each yet in BC there are incidents where a of a passenger ropeway departs from the sheaves. This is known in the industry as a deropement. This case study provides a detailed analysis of deropement incidents reported to Technical Safety BC from 2007 to 2015, and their causes.
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a poisonous gas that is colourless, odourless and tasteless. At low concentrations, symptoms of CO poisoning can mimic the flu: headaches, nausea, fatigue and dizziness. If inhaled in sufficient quantities, CO can interfere with the body’s ability to absorb oxygen causing loss of consciousness and death. This case study provides a detailed analysis of carbon monoxide incidents reported to Technical Safety BC from 2007 to 2015, and their causes.